Kallistra for D and D roleplaying games

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wargamer1979
Posts: 100
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2014 12:46 am

Kallistra for D and D roleplaying games

Post by wargamer1979 » Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:49 pm

Hi Folks,

Today I would like to share with you my Kallistra set up for Mage Knight; a d and d, roleplaying, card drafting game which I have been recently building out of single kallistra tiles and 6mm Leven Miniatures.

The initial setup is as follows:
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I have used plasticine covered with flock and glue to make the mine shaft. Plasticine never actually goes hard - does anybody use plasticine in their models or would you recommend fimo or a clay that sets? Your advice please.
B4379A99-B951-4D0C-837B-206886D31416.jpeg
Here are some of the other models close up - using a Byzantine church instead of the monastery, model camp site and a model of stone henge as a healing circle.
A5961AFC-3F01-4785-9774-AADC38BE188A.jpeg
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Does anybody out there use kallistra for their D and D roleplaying games or dungeon crawls?
Hope to hear from some of you soon with your views...

Best wishes,

Graham

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Norm
Posts: 266
Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2014 6:45 pm

Re: Kallistra for D and D roleplaying games

Post by Norm » Tue Jan 15, 2019 4:41 pm

DAS air dry clay is useful, but it does shrink and can warp as it dries, I don't know whether oven baked FIMO is any better.

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Paul K
Posts: 279
Joined: Tue Oct 08, 2013 10:34 am
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Re: Kallistra for D and D roleplaying games

Post by Paul K » Fri Jan 18, 2019 8:01 pm

As long as the item being modelled isn't to large I would use standard milliput. It goes very hard in a few hours and does not tend to shrink or crack. One trick I've used is to model the shape slightly smaller in styrofoam, then cover the foam in a thin layer of milliput, which you can then texture and shape as required. This method drastically reduces the amount of milliput consumed, and is very fast in that the styrofoam takes little time to cut and shape being relatively soft. The final result is tough and the milliput shell takes paint really well.
Kind regards
Paul

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http://www.kallistra.co.uk

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